News

How do farmers benefit from water boreholes?

Published:

Once the drilling and installation work has been done on your borehole, there is no additional charge for you to use the water you tap in to. It becomes your own, private supply.

How do farmers benefit from water boreholes?

The water experts

WB+AD Morgan has over 70 years’ experience drilling water boreholes, enabling agricultural, domestic and commercial clients to enjoy significant financial savings.

We’ve drilled through a range of challenging ground conditions, from green sand to clay, and can even manage artesian pressure ensuring no matter what ground challenges you face, we can help you.

We are proud to be your water experts.

 

No red tape in the way of a borehole installation

Often farmers believe they must rely on mains water supplies, or that if they want to invest in their own private supply there will be too much red tape in the way.

The reality is if there is water beneath your ground it is your right to access it.  Once the drilling and installation work has been done on your borehole, there is no additional charge for you to use the water you tap in to.  It becomes your own, private supply. 

How much water can I get from my borehole? 

You can extract 20,000 liters per day without the need for any licensing, but as your water experts, we understand that growing crops and caring for livestock means farmers are heavier water users.

So, if you need more than 20,000 liters of water a day, we help you with the acquisition of an abstraction license from the Environment Agency – which is also a client of ours.

The benefits of installing a water borehole for your farm include... 

Long term savings

 The costs of water involved in farming are significant.  Bringing your water supply in-house provides long-term, financial savings.

Discuss how quickly you’ll enjoy a return on your investment in a borehole during your initial, free consultation with a WB+AD Morgan expert.  The team will use your quarterly usage bills to predict how quickly you’ll be cost neutral, and thereafter how much you’ll save annually. 

Water quality

Up to 70% of water from mains supplies comes from recycled wastewater treated with chemicals such as chlorine and fluoride.

With a water well, a simple filtration system is often all that is needed to ensure the water is pure, clean and safe to drink.  

We’ll make sure you know the exact mineral content of your water – and what, if any, additions are needed to ensure it is a perfect supply.

 Livestock often prefer pure borehole water to a chemically treated mains supply.  It is better for them, as they remain sufficiently hydrated.

Increased water pressure

Consistent water pressure is crucial for the successful irrigation of crops.

High demand, pipe leakage, and the distance the water has to travel can impact water pressure for mains supplies.

When utilising your own water well, pressure and flow are consistent meaning you have a supply you can rely on.

Beat the ban

 With the life of crops and livestock dependent on you, hosepipe bans can have a huge effect on the agricultural sector.

 The implication of these bans can be severe, resulting in the failure of crops or the dehydration of animals.

Hosepipe bans become a thing of the past with your own borehole.  These bans don’t apply to private water supplies so you can rely on your supply regardless of drought.

An end-to-end service provider 

We own all our own drilling rigs, we employ experts and we design your borehole in house - meaning we are your end-to-end service provider. We have no need to work with any third parties – cutting inefficiencies and saving you money.

The entire drilling process - from initial consultation, through to licensing, drilling, pump installation and even maintenance-  is done in-house.

We have been serving the agricultural and rural communities since inception.

Contact the team 

Contact the team for your free initial consultation.  Ask questions, understand your projected savings, and start the borehole installation process today.

Published by WB+AD Morgan on